Healthier Finds at Target

I never understood buying food at Target. It made sense that they sold soda, candy bars, and bottled water, but chicken? Bananas? Wild-caught Salmon? Yes. They do. Frozen. But it’s wild.

Jewish or Mexican?

It’s that time of the year, Passover and Easter. A group of my friends celebrated the holidays with a Sedar dinner last night. Everyone brought a delectable dish, some in observance of the holidays, others, well, not. In preparation for the event, I brainstormed what I’ll make and since I was designated to bring a side dish, I scoured the web for passover meal sides. Most site boasted some type of gratin or sauteed asparagus but all of them has their variation of matzoh ball soup. Now, I have never tried matzoh ball soup — though I have had matzoh flatbread a number of times. Plain and crunchy but made of white flour, I figure i could substitute traditional matzoh with a healthier version. I remembered a brown rice cracker that reminded me of the famed Jewish flatbread and put the Hol-Grain crackers, made solely with brown rice and water, on my shopping list. While buying the necessary veggies for the meal, I decided to look at the traditional matzoh ball mixes and was, to put it nicely, appalled:

How clean is your food?

A while back, my sister saw me washing my “triple rinsed” organic spring mix and
exclaimed, “you ARE supposed to wash them even though they’re rinsed, right?
‘Jane’ [some friend] yelled at me for washing my pre-washed veggies!” There are 2 things to consider here:

One:
Many incidences of food borne illnesses have been reported even here in the U.S. We often mistaken our technologically advanced society to be clean and free of infectives often found in lesser developed countries.  However, it’s true. Many of my clients have had parasites, flukes, and bacteria from a less-than-clean meal. It took a lot of knowledge to really understand how badly these critters can harm us. I’m not talking about mile long worms (did you hear about the guinea worms on NPR today?) but improper hygiene leads fecal to food contamination of many many (sometime antibiotic resistant) bugs to make our insides their home.

Oh Dang Oh Deng!

As one of my favorite foods as a child, teenager and well, now, ‘oh-deng’ aka fried fish cakes
are probably one of the most unhealthiest foods in Asian cuisine — that
is, unless you make them yourself with quality ingredients. Oh-deng is fundamentally like crabs cakes — mashed up fish and flour with some oil and maybe some veggies then fried. However, they aren’t
re-battered with breadcrumbs before dunking them in a big pot of hot
oil, nor are they usually prepared at home.

Oh-deng comes in various shapes and sizes and are stir-fried as
banchan (side dishes, used in kimbap (Korean nori rolls – the brownish
beige-ish thing in the picture below), or in a soup.


(image source 1, 2, 3)

A little too much raw onion….

Both the Hubbs and I work at home so I’m constantly in and out of the kitchen. For a snack this afternoon, I made one of my most favorite things in the world: Guacamole.

Well, I call it avocado salsa, because I prefer my avocado in chunks and
not all mushed up. But a bit too much of the raw onions is still
burnin’ up my insides. If you like hot, here’s the recipe. 😀